Phase 2: Power Training

Alright, so previously I detailed the workout I’ll be using for Phase 1. By the end of Phase 1, the off-season is at least halfway over and it’s time to start working with more athletic movements with more range of motion and higher repetitions. After 3 months of improving strength, it’s time to get that strength in motion and start generating some serious power. With this purpose in mind, I’ve chosen the Westside for Skinny Bastards (WS4SB) program. The program is meant for off-season sports training. You could probably spend your entire off-season with this routine and come out of it just fine. The only reason we’re starting with Phase 1 is to periodize our training better to make use of the months available to us. It’s very flexible as long as you know how to balance your push/pull exercises. I’ll show you below what a decently balanced workout looks like. After the repetitive weekly grind of the Texas Method, WS4SB will be a lot more varied and fun with the inclusion of a dynamic-effort lower body day and supersets for the upper body.

Phase 2 should be about a third of the off-season. For me this is 1-2 months. Each week still consists of 4 workouts a week: Max-Effort Upper Body, Dynamic-Effort Lower Body, Repetition Upper Body, and Max-Effort Lower Body. With so many options for each workout, Phase 2 will consist of an A week and a B week.

Max-Effort Upper Body

Week A

Barbell bench press: work up to a max set of 3-5 reps

Chin-ups: 2 sets of max reps

[Superset] Dumbbell rows and Rear delt flyes: 3-4 sets of 8-12 reps

Dumbbell shugs: 3-4 sets of 8-15 reps

Dumbbell curls: 3-4 sets of 8-15 reps

Week B

Weighted chin-ups: work up to a max set of 3-5 reps

Dumbbell incline bench press: 2 sets of max reps

[Superset] Seated cable rows and Face pulls: 3-4 sets of 8-12 reps

Barbell shrugs: 3-4 sets of 8-15 reps

Barbell curls: 3-4 sets of 8-15 reps

Dynamic-Effort Lower Body

Week A

Vertical jumps: 5-8 sets of 1-3 jumps

Bulgarian split squats w/ front foot elevated: 2-3 sets of 8-10 reps

Hyperextensions: 3 sets of 8-12 reps

Hanging leg raises: 4 sets of 10-15 reps

Week B

Broad jumps: 5-8 sets of 1-3 jumps

Barbell step ups: 2-3 sets of 8-10 reps

Romanian deadlifts: 3 sets of 8-12 reps

Russian twists: 4 sets of 10-15 reps

Repetition Upper Body

Week A

Dumbbell incline bench press: 3 sets of max reps

[Superset] Chin-ups and Rear delt flyes: 3-4 sets of 8-12 reps

Dumbbell shoulder press: 4 sets of 8-12 reps

[Superset] Dumbbell shrug and Dumbbell tricep extension: 3 sets of 8-15 reps

Week B

Barbell bench press @ 55-60% of 1RM: 3 sets of max reps

[Superset] Lat pulldown and Face pulls: 3-4 sets of 8-12 reps

Overhead Press: 4 sets of 8-12 reps

[Superset] Barbell shrug and Tricep Pushdown: 3 sets of 8-15 reps

Max-Effort Lower Body

Week A

Barbell squat: work up to a max set of 3-5 reps

Barbell deadlift: 3 sets of 6-12 reps

Swiss ball back bridge + leg curl: 3 sets of 8-12 reps

Ab circuit: 2-3 circuits of 4 exercises for 10-20 reps per exercise

Week B

Barbell deadlift: work up to a max set of 3-5 reps

Barbell squat: 3 sets of 6-12 reps

Hyperextensions: 3 sets of 8-12 reps

Ab circuit: 2-3 circuits of 4 exercises for 10-20 reps per exercise

Practice Plans & Cardio

If I’ve planned this out correctly, Phase 2 starts December and January. My team takes December off entirely to save money and to enjoy the holidays. If we did have practice during Phase 2, then I would encourage the inclusion of interval sprints, push/pull style resistance skating, etc. Start including lactic tolerance work. Avoid this kind of work near the Max-Effort Lower Body days though. Now’s a good time to start building up your conditioning, but strength gains are still a priority. We want to keep making those even if they aren’t made as quickly as in Phase 1.

In Phase 1, I encouraged low intensity cardio as a warm-up and cool-down and to avoid high intensity work. I’ll still encourage that kind of cardio for a warm-up but Phase 2 doesn’t have the same strict incrementation in workload that Phase 1 does, so being well recovered isn’t as important. Trust your own body for when you can fit in a solid cardio session and then go for it! Long low-intensity sessions aren’t terribly helpful for roller derby. If you’re going to spend your time doing cardio, then it should be high intensity interval training (HIIT). Roller derby is HIIT. We’re not training for a marathon here. It doesn’t matter how long you can jog. It matters how long you can sprint and, more importantly, it matters how quickly you can recover so you can sprint some more. HIIT improves your ability to recover between jams. Work yourself up to a high intensity 2 minutes and an active resting 1 minute. I’ll have a post about HIIT options once we get closer to Phase 2.

This Phase is a lot more dynamic and variable, so if anything is unclear be sure to ask in the comments. It’s going to get even more dynamic and variable in Phase 3. Thanks for reading!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: